The Oliver Salt Company

Salt of the Hayward Shoreline

What Else Is It Used For?

View of salt ponds, salt piles, and workers Courtesy of the Hayward Area Historical Society

View of salt ponds, salt piles, and workers
Courtesy of the Hayward Area Historical Society

It is not commonly known that only about 5% of salt produced actually ends up on our dining room tables with the average American consuming about 2 pounds of salt every year.  This begs the obvious question of asking where the remaining 95% of salt goes and what it is used for?  95% is a huge proportion of all the salt that is produced and most days we don’t even think as to where it goes.

Most people only know salt as a spice or as the seasoning that compliments pepper but it is used in so much more than that.  Salt is used for many different reasons including (but certainly are not limited to) tanning leather, refining oil, gold, and silver in steel plants, creating bleach, processing foods, manufacturing ice, baking, making soaps, making synthetic rubber for tires, fish packing, preserving meats, glazing pottery, salting icy roads, bleaching paper for print, adding to water softeners, weed exterminating, fertilizer, textiles, and many other chemical processes.  Additionally, salt has been used as a sort of antibiotic for bee stings, mosquito bites, poison ivy, and even for the removal of tattoos. All of these processes to make our commodities that are used day in and day out depend on the industry of salt.  Salt is not only a necessity for all forms of life, but it also helps to provide many materials that we have become so accustomed to living with.  How much do you rely on salt or the products that are made from it?  What would our lives be without these materials or would there be a substitute for salt within these products?

Advertisements

Information

This entry was posted on March 6, 2013 by .